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New Kentucky law allows same day concealed carry permits for victims of domestic violence

Resource: http://www.wdrb.com/story/26026861/domestic-violence-victims-can-now-get-expedited-concealed-carry-permits
Kentucky now allows same day processing of concealed carry permits for victims of domestic violence.

The new law allows anyone who has received an emergency protective order (commonly called a restraining order) to get a temporary concealed carry permit the very same day at the courthouse. The person does not have to go through the mandatory training period to receive their permit and does require a background check.

According to State Representative Jared Carpenter, "When someone in a domestic violence situation obtains a Emergency Protective Order or Domestic Violence Order it is almost always because they are afraid they are in danger of imminent physical harm. This bill provides an expedited process to apply for a temporary permit. They must complete training in 45 days to get a permanent concealed carry permit. If they don't complete training, their permit expires, so it is offering an option for protection but requiring proactive training to carry a firearm."



Former Louisville Metro Police Department sergeant Denny Butler said, "A judge has said, 'law enforcement protect them the best you can'. We're going to do the best we can but, just because of circumstances, why wouldn't we give that individual the right to carry concealed so they can protect themselves"

Of course, so called women's rights groups think this is a bad idea. According to Judy Strnad, Executive Director of the Artemis Center, "It actually makes a situation more volatile, more lethal for that woman."

I suppose it's better for that same woman to be unarmed and be attacked again or possibly killed without the chance to defend herself. Just another example of why some "women's advocacy" groups are actually pushing the image of women as victims who need someone else to protect them.

"Should we have them feel like an inmate in their own home if they're that scared?," said Butler.




What do you think of this law?