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RECALL: Remington to Replace Triggers in 7.5+ Million Rifles

Resource: http://www.cnbc.com/id/102236497
Remington's 50+ years of denying there were problems with the Model 700 rifles have resulted in the largest recall in history. 

Under the settlement, Remington will upgrade the rifles in question at no cost to the owner. Many users have already installed new triggers and Remington will reimburse them as part of the settlement. For guns that cannot be retrofitted, the company plans to offer vouchers for Remington products.








The settlement covers more than a dozen models, specifically the Model 700, Seven, Sportsman 78, 673, 710, 715, 770, 600, 660, XP-100, 721, 722 and 725.

The well known design flaw (as dozens of Youtube videos show) allows the gun to fire without the trigger being touched. The massively popular rifle, with more than 7.85 million units sold, could have been fixed in 1948 at a cost of 5.5 cents per unit. It will cost significantly more now. 

The issue gained national attention when 2010 CNBC documentary, "Remington Under Fire: A CNBC Investigation," explored allegations that for decades the company covered up a design defect.



The settlement involves a class action suit brought in 2013 by Ian Pollard of Concordia, Missouri, who claimed his Remington 700 rifle fired on multiple occasions without the trigger being pulled. The agreement also settles a similar class action case in Washington state.The Pollard suit accused Remington and its owners of negligence, breach of warranty, unfair and deceptive trade practices, and fraudulent concealment—some of it involving the company's formal response to the 2010 CNBC documentary.


At least two dozen deaths and more than 100 serious injuries have been linked to inadvertent discharges of Remington 700 series rifles.


In court filings, Remington denied the allegations, calling them "inaccurate, misleading, (and) taken out of context." And last year, a judge dismissed several of the claims, including negligence and fraudulent concealment. But by this July, the parties announced they were working out details of a "nationwide class settlement" involving the controversial gun.



Under the settlement, which still must be approved by a judge, Remington has agreed to retrofit the rifles in question at no cost to the owner. Many users had new trigger mechanisms installed on their own, and Remington will reimburse them as part of the settlement. For guns that cannot be retrofitted, the company plans to offer vouchers for Remington products.








About the Author:
Lil Red Danger is a firearms enthusiast, firearms instructor, and spokeswoman for the firearms industry.

Raised in an anti-gun household, she first fired a gun 3 years ago and it was love at first shot.


Follow Little Red Danger on Facebook.